Interdisciplinary Studies

Courses

The singular objective for this course is to provide assessment opportunities for graduating senior Bachelor of General Studies students. The course serves as the coordination point for program assessment.

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A study of a particular topic not otherwise available in the curriculum. The content of this course will vary from semester to semester, and students may potentially enroll more than once. This class is not available for General Education credit.

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An introductory application of economic concepts to a wide variety of current social issues and problems.

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A study of ideal societies as portrayed in fiction with emphasis on the values we place upon such key ideas as concern for environment and natural resources, genetic and behavioral engineering, freedom vs security and control, health care and education, and the role of the arts as we strive to achieve the best possible life we can.

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A study of the literature of nature and the environment with special emphasis on literary and environmental texts that explore the ecological relationship between human culture, the creative imagination, and the natural world.

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A one-hour intensive exploration of a topic in the humanities. The class may require travel and/or service learning, and it may require payment of an additional fee.

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A study of the United States of America and its role in the world as a multicultural democracy, with specific emphasis given to cultural diversity as embodied in the ideal notion of pluralistic identity. Through the social sciences, humanities and arts, history, and international perspectives, the course will explore the principles and dynamics of diversity in the United States while promoting social responsibility and demonstrating civic competency.

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Social justice: action and policy examines public policy decisions from the perspective of social and economic justice. Historical and contemporary implications relative to justice will be analyzed.

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An extensive study of technology and the impact that it has on human society. This course will examine, discuss, and explore the materials, processes, innovations, and applications of technology and the various perspectives and issues associated with the role of technology in society.

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A study of a particular topic not otherwise available in the curriculum. The content of the course will vary from semester to semester, and students may potentially enroll more than once. This class is not available for General Education credit.

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An examination of ethical issues which result from our expanding biological knowledge such as animal rights, genetic testing, biological engineering, abortion, euthanasia, the impact of humans on the environment, and the just allocation of resources.

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An examination of ethical issues in the professional lives of people in science, education, medicine, law, and business arising from the challenge of maintaining personal integrity in the face of apparent conflicts of duty.

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A human geography of natural, social, cultural, economic, political, and other issues existing in late 20th century United States, with implications toward the 21st century.

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A study of the interrelationships and transformations of outlook, science, and technology, culture attributes, economic systems, and social structures in world civilizations over the past three centuries, with special attention given to the development of modern institutions and perspectives.

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The purpose of this course is to educate and encourage the development of globally competent citizens and leaders. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be engaged, responsible and effective members of a globally interdependent society. Most importantly, students will be asked to think deeply about their world (including its future, current issues, its impact on their local area,and our personal responsibility as global citizens).

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An integrative look at our historically changing conceptions of the mind, and how best to study and understand them. The course will cover elements of philosophy, psychology, neural science, computer science, linguistics, and their convergence intro the interdisciplinary field of cognitive science.

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This course explores the relationship between media and politics in America, focusing on the process and power of media including its use by citizens, political interest groups, candidates and political leaders as well as its effect on information, civic involvement, and voter turnout.

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Review of current global environmental issues. Course will explore origins, development and effects of philosophy, religion, frontier and colonial experiences, science, technology, economics, and political ideologies upon environmental attitudes. Environmental ethics and sustainability will be examined.

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An orientation to the MLS as an opportunity to enhance the critical thinking, analytical and writing skills so valued in today's world and workplace. The purpose of the course is to help the student become acquainted with the concept of interdisciplinary liberal education and understand its potential in fostering intellectual growth, personal satisfaction and the ability to enhance employability in a world where knowledge has become the key resource.

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A comparative, critical exploration of the nature, kinds, worth, and limits of human knowledge. Roughly equal amounts of attention are given to (A) the sciences, (B) the arts and humanities, and (C) a selection from a menu of such special topics as mathematical knowledge, epistemic relativism, moral knowledge, religious knowledge, and the role of the search for knowledge in well-lived human lives.

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Origins and implications of the knowledge society involves understanding the historial origins and the current and future implications of the information revolution that is unfolding. As our society ushers in the information revolution, a deeper understanding of new ways of knowing will serve as a catalyst for the future. Substantial changes in the social, political, educational, and economic contexts are the destined targets of the information/knowledge shift. This course focuses on where these changes come from, what the likely changes will be, and the utility of such changes on the way we know, learn, and grow.

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Information literacy develops the utilization of information in the graduate learning process. A fuller appreciation and recognition of the need for information, identification of needed information, networking and technical skills associated with locating the information, and critical consideration of information are addressed. Students should expect to be more thoughtful consumers of scholarly and applied research and current modern information technologies.

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The purpose of this course is to provide a graduate level introduction to the seven driving forces of change that are expected to transform the world over the next 25 years. The course will educate and encourage the development of globally competent citizens and leaders, and prepare them to engage in in-depth, graduate-level exploration of each of these areas of revolutionary change. The course is designed to provide students with the knowledge, skills and attitudes to be engaged, responsible and effective members of a globally interdependent society.

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This course introduces students to descriptive and inferential statistics and their applicability to decision making. Students will explore measures of central tendency and variability, probability theory, estimation and hypothesis testing, and regression models.

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Directed readings on a specific topic in liberal studies.

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An applied and technique oriented offering in which students engage in qualitative and/or quantitative research projects, or other experience of significant academic value. Meant to fulfill the culminating experience requirements of Master of Liberal Studies degree students.

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Course will provide in-depth study of a particular topic in interdisciplinary studies at the graduate level. The course title and topic of study will be displayed in the class schedule.

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This course is designed for students in their final stages of the Master of Liberal Studies program. Activities include practical experience in an organization which will allow the student to participate in a meaningful project.

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Thesis in interdisciplinary studies is a directed multi-disciplinary study resulting in a specific final research paper or project. Thesis is designed to provide empirical study in preparation for further academic work. Study results in a bound thesis. A student may enroll in this course a maximum of two times, up to 6 hours total.

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An introduction to many styles of folk and classical music from around the world and the cultural causes and effects of this music.

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Last updated: 05/28/2019