Sociology

Sociology is the study of social life and the social causes and consequences of human behavior. The challenges we face today - changing family structures, cultural diversity, community development, globalization, urbanization, social inequality, terrorism, environmental change, migration - provide students like you with fantastic opportunities. A sociology degree develops strong critical thinking and problem-solving skills, and prepares you for a variety of rewarding careers where you can make a lasting impact on the lives of others.

The department offers a Bachelor of Science (BS) or Bachelor of Arts (BA) degree in Sociology, an addictions counseling track options inside either the BS or BA, and many certificate opportunities. Our curriculum allows each student to craft a program of study - providing the theoretical knowledge and applied experiences applicable to both the workplace and advanced academic pursuits. It is a broad, sturdy degree that has prepared students for success in a wide array of graduate degree programs. Our programs are available on-campus and online.

Department of Sociology

Courses

For new sociology majors. A general overview of sociology as a scientific discipline, and discussion of university resources, career opportunities, university and departmental requirements and techniques for becoming a successful student.

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Provides an understanding of basic concepts and theoretical paradigms and recognizes the contribution of major figures in the discipline. This includes the study of social processes, institutions, and the relationship of the individual to social structures.

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An investigation of basic principles associated with all human cultures including historical evolution of culture; using macro-sociological and cultural anthropoligical perspectives specific preliterate and modern cultures are compared and analyzed.

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This course introduces students to key issues in the study of women and gender-such as class, race, sexuality, family life, work, and political power-and to the various methods of inquiry that different academic disciplines use to examine these issues. The course analyzes what it means to be female in contemporary societies, seeks to discover the historical factors that have shaped the current status of women from all parts of the world, and explores the various means by which women have attempted to achieve equality and empowerment.

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This course examines the evolution of feminist thought over the past two centuries and considers the extent to which feminist theories have shaped and been shaped by social, economic, and cultural factors. The course explores a range of theoretical frameworks-including Marxism, Freudian psychoanalytic theory, materialism, radical feminism, and postmodernism-that feminists have applied to important and contested issues, such as the body, subjectivity, sexual difference, diveristy, race, sexual orientation, identity politics, and colonialism.

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This course explores sociology, cinema, and society. Students will examine how major sociological concepts (such as social class, race, and gender), social institutions (such as the family, politics, and economics), and culture and technology are protrayed in various motion pictures. Students will also examine how American society is reflected in motion pictures produced during different eras.

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This course considers the theoretical basis of media and cultural studies from both a critical and constructionist perspective, taking a close look at the production and consumption of culture. It examines how popular culture in the U.S. manifests in our daily lives through the media and other social institutions and actually reflects and perpetuates social inequities based on class, race, religion, age and gender. The course offers a critical perspective on mass media systems, but, more broadly, it engages the student in the world of popular culture as a venue for understanding the influence of media systems' many social structures.

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This course 1) analyzes periods of human cultural development with a special emphasis on recent culture change and global integration (sometimes called globalization) and 2) analyzes and compares the main characteristics of representative modern world cultures (developing, industrial and postindustrial) in the context of the rapid change that is sweeping across the globe. No prerequisite

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All cultures change, but for a variety of reasons. This course studies the forces for culture change from a scientific perspective. It attempts to isolate these forces as they have affected cultures in the past. It studies how the forces are working in current indigenous cultures. In addition, it provides rules that will allow the student to gauge the probability for change in the future.

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Traces the consequences of being born male or female. Sex roles are viewed as social constructions which influence and, in some cases, define an individual's life. The formulation, transmission, maintenance, and reformulation of sex roles is examined.

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Looks at society as a cluster of rules and examines the various categories of rule-breakers. Emphasis on how one comes to be defined as a rulebreaker, what means of social control are employed to ensure conformity, and how some rule-breaking is legitimated.

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Offers subjects that are not dealt with in the regular curriculum. See the semester class schedule for specific topics.

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Analysis of assertiveness, aggression, and passivity, with applications to everyday life. Special focus on assertiveness as a healthy interpersonal orientation.

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Designed to offer on an irregular basis subjects which are not dealt with in the regular curriculum. See the semester class schedule for specific topics.

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This course provides a framework and perspective for analyzing the family as a communication system. Among topics covered are multigenerational communication, the impact of ethnicity on communication patterns, the role of everyday rituals, the development of intimacy among family members, and family models and family conflict resolution strategies.

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This course will assist students in exploring the history of stepfamilies and the challenges faced in developing and maintaining healthy stepfamily relationships. Among topics covered are stepfamily myths, the couple relationships, financial and legal concerns, stages of stepfamily development, step-parenting, children with stepfamilies, adult stepchildren, and the extended family.

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A sociological analysis of the meaning and place of death in contemporary society. Attention focused on the factors contributing to the mortality revolution and how this revolution is forcing a reconceptualization of dying, death, and bereavement. Cross-cultural, death-management practices, as well as the American way of death, will be examined. Special focus will be concentrated on emerging problems and the process of institutional reformulation in the area of death and dying.

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An overview of major classical and contemporary sociological theories. An examination and comparison/contrast of the theoretical dimensions of the theories. An application of theory to contemporary social phenomena.

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The process of knowledge production and research design. Selected aspects of the philosophy of science and the logic of inquiry are related to the basic techniques of qualitative and quantitative research.

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Every direction we turn in our community and world there are opportunities to do good by helping others in need through grassroots social action. Social entrepreneurship is defined as the use of innovation to find new ways to help categories of people in need. This course helps students 1) identify categories of people in need about whom they most care, 2)understand the challenges and successes of existing grassroots social action organizations, 3)learn the principles for designing a grassroots community project to help others in need, and 4)build a grassroots social action project on paper (that can later be initiated if desired by the student). Many students who take this course want to build grassroots social action organizing skills now for use later in life. Some students want to build a career in the area of social entrepreneurship.

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An overview of several sociological subjects as they impact public health. These subjects include demographic and social factors and illness, epidemiology, the meaning and experience of illness, health care systems and settings in the US and abroad, an overview of health care providers, and a brief introduction to bioethics.

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Comparative perspective with emphasis on U.S. multi-ethnic and multicultural relations. Theories of prejudice/discrimination. Demographic trends, stratifications, and monitoring of contemporary issues facing selected U.S. ethnic groups.

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A sociological analysis of many of the major social problems in the U.S., such as inequality, crime, sexism, racism, power and education. Such problems are examined from several different perspectives.

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A sociological analysis of the family as a basic social institution. Attention focused on the creation, transmission, and reformulation of the rules of sexual behavior, marriage, childbearing, residence, descent, and authority with emphasis on enhancing the ability of individuals to make informed choices.

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A survey of theories of social change, emphasizing the problems associated with the concept of change. Differences between dialectical and developmental approaches to social change are explored. The relationship between cultural change and social change is examined.

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Analysis of the influence of social factors on the individual. Focus on psychological sociology, with theoretical and practical application of such processes as conformity, conflict, cooperation, perception, affiliation, etc.

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Examination of the process by which social relations become ordered, structural products of this process; emphasis upon institutions and formal organizations.

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This course provides a review of the historical origins of social demography as a field of study, population perspectives, national and global population trends, data analysis methods, and the three main forces of population change: fertility, mortality, and migration (and their singular and interactive impact on societies and social institutions). Examination includes various population issues, with emphases on the rural-to-urban transition and environmental change. Students are actively engaged in data analysis and interpretation using the US Census.

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This course engages students in the study of social movements and political contention occuring in the modern era. The course focuses on the architecture of movement emergence, growth, and decline, from political opportunities and collective action frames to mobilizing resources and developing tactics. Throughout, students will examine competing ideologies and interactions between movements and political institutions.

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This course will examine social structures, social processes, and social life of people coming from different parts of the world. In addition to providing an overview of cultures of different societies, the course will focus on a number of institutions, for instance, family, education, economics, politics, religion, and healthcare. Particular focus will be given to specific countries in different world regions.

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An examination of trends in sexuality, sex roles, fertility, marital and non-marital relations; parenting and the impact of changing sexual practices on individuals and institutions.

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Grant money to assist people in need is available for all communities and all categories of people in need in the U.S. and most of the world. However, the competiiton for this money is normally very high. In this course, students learn how to 1) package their ideas for a grant in the most compelling manners, and 2) prepare each part of a grant proposal to be powerful as possible. Grant writing is a highly desired professional skill, and those who have this skill often experience improved job mobility and job security. Some students who take this course seek this professional edge in their careers, while other students want to use their grant writing skill on a volunteer basis. Volunteer grant writing is often done for one's church, a local school, the local fire department or ambulance service - and to meet a vast array of other grassroots community needs.

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This course teaches skills for applying theoretical and methodological knowledge of the discipline to real world problems/issues. Students will learn techniques for applying content knowledge and methodological knowledge to the arenas of government, non-profits, and forprofits. Students will also learn how to convey to such entities the importance and utility of their own personal knowledge/skills learned from the discipline. Students will work with a "client" as a requirement of the course.

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A theoretical and empirical examination of structured social inequality in societies based on power, privilege, and prestige.

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This course provides the opportunity to more intensively investigate several issues introduced in SOC 470, Grant Writing. Students learn how to 1)conduct needs assessments to obtain strong local data to be used when building a program for a grant proposal, 2)build a social program on paper following a 15-step process, and 3)formally evaluate a social program.

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This course provides an examination of rural, urban, and suburban life including the processes of urbanization (the transition from rural to urban society) and suburbanization. Topics also include the development of the scientific study of rural and urban society; the symbiotic relationship between rural and urban areas; the historical development of cities; city planning and development; and an examination of social, demographic and ecological forces shaping the rural, urban and suburban life, and social problems in these areas. Students will perform empirical research in their own communities and interpret their findings.

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Human relationships constitute distinctive and important social phenomena, which require a systematic conceptualization in order to develop, maintain, and/or modify them. The purpose of this course is to gain an understanding of human relationships that will make possible their systematic assessment and classification and provide a basis for intervention to improve their functioning.

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An applied and technique-oriented course in which students learn to perform basic and advanced statistical analysis of quantitative data using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and complete a research project involving the development of a theory-driven hypothesis(es), as well as testing of the hypothesis(es) through data collection or acquisition, analysis of the data and the reporting of conclusions. Graduate students will be required to collect data and learn additional statistical techniques.

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An applied and technique-oriented course in which students learn to perform basic and advanced statistical analysis of quantitative data using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) and complete a research project involving the development of a theory-driven hypothesis(es), as well as testing of the hypothesis(es) through data collection or acquisition, analysis of the data and the reporting of conclusions. Graduate students will be required to collect data and learn additional statistical techniques.

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An examination of the status of older adults in contemporary American society, focusing on the social aspcts of aging and integrating theory and research on aging from a wide range of disciplines. Sensitizes students to optimal and successful aging.

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An examination of the status of older adults in contemporary American society, focusing on the social aspcts of aging and integrating theory and research on aging from a wide range of disciplines. Sensitizes students to optimal and successful aging.

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The study of traditional indigenous cultures and how they contrast with industrial/post-industrial societies regarding family, politics, economics, and religion.

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The study of traditional indigenous cultures and how they contrast with industrial/post-industrial societies regarding family, politics, economics, and religion.

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Selected topics are subjected to intensive examination. Emphasis is upon student participation in discussions and extra class projects. Of special interest to students in the areas of business, teaching, social work, and school administration.

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Selected topics are subjected to intensive examination. Emphasis is upon student participation in discussions and extra class projects. Of special interest to students in the areas of business, teaching, social work, and school administration.

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Reading and/or research programs to fit the individual needs of advanced students in the social sciences. Topics are chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor.

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Reading and/or research programs to fit the individual needs of advanced students in the social sciences. Topics are chosen in consultation with a faculty advisor.

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Advanced work in selected areas such as medical sociology, the profession of sociology, sociology of knowledge, occupations and professions. Emphasis on student participation.

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Advanced work in selected areas such as medical sociology, the profession of sociology, sociology of knowledge, occupations and professions. Emphasis on student participation.

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Course is designed to provide practical experience in teaching and administration in sociology or for participating in a facultysponsored research project.

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Course is designed to provide practical experience in teaching and administration in sociology or for participating in a facultysponsored research project.

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For sociology majors with good academic standing. Provides practical experience in community organizations and social agencies. Systematic recording and reporting of the work experience and supplementary reading are required.

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For sociology majors with good academic standing. Provides practical experience in community organizations and social agencies. Systematic recording and reporting of the work experience and supplementary reading are required.

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This course provides a dynamic exploration of the sociological concept of community. Students will examine the study of human relationship patterns, human ecology, and social networks. In addition, formal and informal social interaction and social capital will be explored. This course actively engages students in theoretical activity and puts knowledge to work through class assignments and activities.

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This course provides a dynamic exploration of the sociological concept of community. Students will examine the study of human relationship patterns, human ecology, and social networks. In addition, formal and informal social interaction and social capital will be explored. This course actively engages students in theoretical activity and puts knowledge to work through class assignments and activities.

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Managing and operating non-profit agencies requires a set of skills that are duplicative, yet different from those of operating a for-profit corporation. Learn about similarities and differences of management and operations of agencies whose mission is to serve the community, as opposed to making a profit for the shareholders. This course will explore the process of incorporating a nonprofit organization, including developing a mission statement, and the steps involved in securing tax exemption through the Internal Revenue Service. Students will develop an understanding of a) leadership and management of human resources in a nonprofit with limited resources; b) the role of the internal and external environment in developing a strategic plan; c) managing the financial position of the organization; and d) the role of marketing and public relations to meet the organizational mission of a nonprofit organization.

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Managing and operating non-profit agencies requires a set of skills that are duplicative, yet different from those of operating a for-profit corporation. Learn about similarities and differences of management and operations of agencies whose mission is to serve the community, as opposed to making a profit for the shareholders. This course will explore the process of incorporating a nonprofit organization, including developing a mission statement, and the steps involved in securing tax exemption through the Internal Revenue Service. Students will develop an understanding of a) leadership and management of human resources in a nonprofit with limited resources; b) the role of the internal and external environment in developing a strategic plan; c) managing the financial position of the organization; and d) the role of marketing and public relations to meet the organizational mission of a nonprofit organization.

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Through case studies and the use of the sociological and other perspectives, this course analyzes Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs), their values, structure, history, and roles in the field of development and social change. The course focuses particular attention in the international field by analyzing NGOs in less developed countries.

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Through case studies and the use of the sociological and other perspectives, this course analyzes Non Governmental Organizations (NGOs), their values, structure, history, and roles in the field of development and social change. The course focuses particular attention in the international field by analyzing NGOs in less developed countries.

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This course provides instruction on how to write powerful and compelling grant proposals to fund projects to assist categories of people in need. Students learn how to write the most difficult and complex types of grant proposals for both private foundations and government funding sources.

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Last updated: 09/04/2019